Speech-Language Pathology

Speech-Language Pathology2020-10-01T18:51:36+00:00

Overview of Service

The Speech-Language Pathologists at Holland Connections design an individualized treatment plan in order to maximize communication. Our therapists have specialized training in a wide variety of interventions to meet your child’s needs. If your child is struggling to meet developmental milestones on time, please contact our team to schedule an evaluation, or to learn more about our program.

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Therapeutic Techniques and Interventions for Speech-Language Pathology

  • Articulation Therapy
  • Minimal Pairs
  • Phonemic Awareness
  • Beckman Oral Motor Exercises
  • Cycles Approach
  • Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing (DTTC)
  • Social Stories
  • Parent Training
  • Cycles Approach
  • Aided Language Stimulation
  • Core Vocabulary
  • Modeling
  • Coaching
  • Early Intervention
  • Language Therapy
  • Oral Language Intervention
  • Milieu Approach

Developmental Milestones Related to Speech-Language Pathology

  • Birth-3 Months: 

    • Makes cooing sounds
    • Cries change for different needs
    • Startles at loud sounds
    • Quiets or smiles when someone talks
  • 4 to 6 Months: 

    • Moves eyes in direction of sounds
    • Responds to changes in tone of voice
    • Notices that toys make sounds
    • Pays attention to music
    • Coos or babbles when playing
    • Giggles or laughs
    • Makes sounds when happy or upset
  • 7 months – 1 year: 

    • Looks when someone points
    • Turns when their name is called
    • Understands words for common items and people
    • Starts to respond to simple words (i.e. no, come here)
    • Uses sounds and gestures to get and keep attention
    • Points to objects and shows them to others
    • Uses gestures like waving by or shaking head no
    • Says one or two words
    • Babbles longer strings of sounds (like mimi, upup, or baba)
  • 1 – 2 years: 

    • Points to a few body parts when asked
    • Follows 1-part directions (i.e. “roll ball”)
    • Responds to simple questions (i.e. “who is that?”)
    • Points to pictures in a book when named
    • Uses a lot of novel words
    • Starts to name pictures in books
    • Asks simple questions (“what’s that?” or “where is kitty?”)
    • Puts two words together (“no bed” or “mommy book”)
    • Child is approximately 25% intelligible
  • 2-3 years: 

    • Understands opposites (i.e. go/stop or up/down)
    • Follows 2-part directions (i.e. “get the spoon and put it on the table”)
    • Understands new words quickly
    • Talks about things that are not in the room
    • Uses words like “in” “on” and “under”
    • Uses 2 or 3 words to talk about or ask for things
    • Asks “why?”
    • Starts to use a variety of speech sounds including p, b, m, d, n, h, t, k, g, w, ng, f, and y in words
    • Familiar people understand the child’s speech (50-75% intelligible)
  • 3-4 years: 

    • Responds when you call them from another room
    • Understands words for some colors/shapes
    • Understands words for family (brother, grandma, aunt)
    • Answers simple who, what, and where questions
    • Says rhyming words like hat-cat
    • Uses pronouns and some plurals
    • Puts 4 words together. May make some mistakes (ex: I goed to school.)
    • Talks about what happened during the day
    • Using all early sound and beginning to use the sounds l, j, ch, s, v, sh, and z
    • Most people understand the child (75-100% intelligible)
  • 4-5 years: 

    • Understands word for order and time, like first/last and today/tomorrow
    • Follows longer directions (ex: “put on your pajamas, brush your teeth and pick out a book”)
    • Follows classroom directions (ex: draw a circle around something you can eat”)
    • Hears and understands most things at home and school
    • Uses sentences that have more than 1 action word
    • Tells a short story
    • Keeps a conversation going
    • Uses all earlier sounds and is begining to use the sounds r, zh, and voiced th (ex: their)
  • 5-6 years: 

    • Listens to, and understands, stories
    • Follows a simple conversation
    • Answers questions like “what did you have for lunch today?”
    • Retells a story or talks about something they did
    • Takes turns talking and keeping a conversation going
    • Should have all speech sounds mastered in words with the exception of voiceless th (ex: thumb)
    • Knows how books work
    • Understands that sounds make up words
    • Tells you the first sounds of a word
    • Can say the sounds some letters make (ex: buh for B)
    • Knows some sight words
    • “Reads” a few books by memory
  • 6-7 years: 

    • Follows 2 – 3 step directions in a row
    • Tells and retells stories that make sense
    • Uses most parts of speech, or grammar, correctly
    • Stays on topic and takes turns in conversation
    • Gives directions
    • Can clearly be understood by others
    • Names all sounds in short words
    • Matches spoken words with written words
    • Sounds out words when reading
    • Reads 100 common words by sight
    • Reads grade-level books
    • Understands what they read
  • 7-8 years: 

    • Follows 3-4 directions in a row
    • Understands direction words, like here, there, over, and next to
    • Asks and answers who, what, where, when and why questions
    • Gives directions with 3-4 steps
    • Stays on topic, maintains eye contact and starts/ends conversations
    • Uses clues when reading to figure out words (looking at pictures or titles to help read a word)
    • Finds information to answer questions
    • Explains important points of a story (ex: main idea, characters, and plot)
  • 8-9 years: 

    • Pays attention in groups
    • Uses words related to school subjects (math, science, history vocabulary)
    • Participates in a group conversation
    • Summarizes a story
    • Uses word analysis skills (knowing root words, prefixes and suffixes)
    • Uses clues from story to help understand what they read
    • Predict and explain what will happen next in a story
    • Asks and answers questions about what they have read
    • Uses what they know to learn about new topics
  • 9-10 years: 

    • Forms opinions based on what they hear
    • Uses language for many reasons (asking questions, arguing, joking)
    • Understands some figurative language (ex: “this class is a zoo!”)
    • Takes part in group discussions
    • Summarizes ideas in their own words
    • Organizes information so it is clear
    • Gives clear speeches
    • Follows written directions
    • Takes brief notes
    • Links what they learn from one subject to another
    • Paraphrases what they read in their own words

Common diagnoses that may benefit from Speech-Language Pathology

  • Accent Modification
  • ADD
  • ADHD
  • Angelman Syndrome
  • Aphasia
  • Apraxia of Speech
  • Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC)
  • Articulation Disorder
  • Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Brain Injury
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Childhood Stroke
  • Cleft Lip/Cleft Palate
  • Cluttering/Stuttering/Dysfluency
  • Cochlear Implant
  • Cognitive Disorders
  • Concussion
  • Craniofacial Malformations
  • Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  • Delayed Milestones
  • Developmental Delays
  • Down Syndrome
  • Dysarthria
  • Dyslexia
  • Epilepsy
  • Expressive Language Disorder
  • Failure to Thrive
  • Feeding Difficulties
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Generalized Weakness
  • Intellectual Disability
  • Kabuki Syndrome
  • Kawasaki Disease 
  • Laryngitis (recurring)
  • Late Talker
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Lip Tie
  • Mitochondrial Disorder
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • Oral Motor Weakness
  • Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders
  • Phonological Disorder
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Post-Surgical Needs
  • Prader-Willi Syndrome
  • Prematurity
  • Pervasive Developmental Disorder
  • Reading Disorders
  • Receptive Language Disorder
  • Seizure Disorders
  • Social Pragmatic Communication Disorder
  • Selective Mutism
  • Specific Learning Impairments (SLI)
  • Spina Bifida
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Stroke/Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA)
  • Tongue Tie
  • Tongue Thrust
  • Voice Disorder
  • Vocal Nodules

*Your child does not need a medical or educational diagnosis to qualify for Speech-Language Pathology services.

Our mission at Holland Connections is to help individuals across the lifespan gain or regain functional independence within meaningful activities in order to live life to the fullest. Whether it is teaching a child with a diagnosis of autism to speak their first words or helping an adult who experienced a traumatic brain injury regain skills to return to work, our team of passionate Speech-Language Pathologists and Occupational Therapists is committed to facilitating life-long learning in a safe and supportive environment. The members of the multidisciplinary team at Holland Connections specialize in the development of client-centered programming and implementation of evidence-based interventions to assist individuals with reaching their greatest potential while having fun along the way.

Holland Connections

West Location (housed within Holland Center):
10273 Yellow Circle Dr. Minnetonka, MN 55343

East Location (housed within Holland Center):
1160 Centre Pointe Drive Mendota Heights, MN 55120

Eden Prairie Location (housed within Holland Life): 6533 Flying Cloud Drive Suite 200 Eden Prairie MN 55344